This Website Maybe For Sale – Click Here -

STATES Resource Center

Source Match State News

Will it work? Glitzy casino opening on industrial waterfront

Will it work? Glitzy casino opening on industrial waterfront The $2.6 billion gambling, hotel and entertainment complex brings Las Vegas opulence to the unlikeliest of places: a largely industrial waterfront home to a subway train repair yard, a water and sewer agency facility and a power plant. Massachusetts leaders hope the resort and its curved, bronze-toned hotel tower — echoing the company's distinctive properties in Vegas and Macau — transforms the city's reputation as an industrial afterthought. "We were ready for something like this," Mayor Carlo DeMaria said last week, putting forth a vision of a thriving waterfront district of hotels, restaurants and shops.


Members-Only Race Circuits Let You Put Pedal to the Metal and Then Enjoy a Chef’s Feast

Members-Only Race Circuits Let You Put Pedal to the Metal and Then Enjoy a Chef’s Feast There's nothing like an après-drive cocktail.


Is It Too Late to Buy Celgene Stock?

Is It Too Late to Buy Celgene Stock? The clock is ticking for Celgene's acquisition by Bristol-Myers Squibb. But is Celgene still a stock worth buying?


Better Buy: Aurora Cannabis vs. Gilead Sciences

Better Buy: Aurora Cannabis vs. Gilead Sciences Between this unlikely pair, which stock is the better pick for long-term investors?


South Africa youth unemployment a 'national crisis': president

South Africa youth unemployment a 'national crisis': president Youth unemployment in South Africa has become a "national crisis", President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Sunday at an event commemorating youth activism during the apartheid era. Unemployment in Africa's most advanced economy has remained stubbornly high since white minority rule ended 25 years ago, and creating jobs is a major challenge for Ramaphosa as he aims to reignite an underperforming economy. Unemployment inched up to 27.6% in the first quarter, official data showed in May, underscoring the task faced by Ramaphosa after his ANC party won re-election last month.


3 Top Artificial Intelligence Stocks to Watch in June

3 Top Artificial Intelligence Stocks to Watch in June Is your portfolio ready for the next big thing in technology?


2020 race brings free college back to the national stage

2020 race brings free college back to the national stage After receding from the national stage, the free college movement is resurfacing as a central rallying point for Democrats as they set their sights on the White House. At least 18 of the party's 23 presidential contenders have come out in support of some version of free college . Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota says it should be limited to two years of community college.


Pope dons helmet to enter earthquake-hit cathedral in Italy

Pope dons helmet to enter earthquake-hit cathedral in Italy Pope Francis donned a white firefighter's safety helmet Sunday to enter a damaged cathedral during a visit to central Italy, where he gave encouragement to people still struggling three years after devastating earthquakes struck. Francis traveled to the town of Camerino, which was shaken so badly in 2016 that people are still not allowed into the town center as work continues to stabilize buildings. Before he entered the cathedral, a firefighter's safety helmet was placed over Francis' skullcap.


Alabama orders 'chemical castration' of some child molesters

Alabama orders 'chemical castration' of some child molesters Alabama will require some sex offenders whose crimes involve children to take chemical castration medication during parole, a requirement that has prompted some legal concerns and appears to be rarely used in some states that allow it. The law will require sex offenders whose crimes involved children under 13 to receive the medication that is supposed to lower sex drive. At least seven other states allow chemical treatments to reduce male testosterone for certain sex offenders, but the procedure appears rarely used.


Rallying-Sordo wins in Sardinia after late blow to Tanak's hopes

Rallying-Sordo wins in Sardinia after late blow to Tanak's hopes Spaniard Dani Sordo won the Rally of Italy in Sardinia for Hyundai on Sunday after Toyota's overnight leader Ott Tanak suffered a steering problem on the final stage and slumped to fifth. Tanak, who still took over the championship lead from Citroen's Sebastien Ogier, had been 26.7 seconds clear and heading for his third win in a row going into the final Sassari-Argentiera 2 power stage. Finland's Teemu Suninen finished second for M-Sport Ford, 13.7 seconds behind, with Norwegian Andreas Mikkelsen third for Hyundai and claiming five bonus points from the power stage.


Extinction Rebellion postpones Heathrow drone protest plan

Extinction Rebellion postpones Heathrow drone protest plan The environmental activist group Extinction Rebellion has postponed a plan to shut down London's Heathrow Airport with drones after it was criticized by politicians and police. The group still aims to target the airport, Europe's busiest, but said it would not fly drones within flightpaths, and would give two months' notice so travelers could make other plans.


Extinction Rebellion postpones Heathrow drone protest plan

Extinction Rebellion postpones Heathrow drone protest plan The environmental activist group Extinction Rebellion has postponed a plan to shut down London's Heathrow Airport with drones after it was criticized by politicians and police. The group still aims to target the airport, Europe's busiest, but said it would not fly drones within flightpaths, and would give two months' notice so travelers could make other plans.


Russian Gold-Backed Crypto Slams the Global US Dollar Standard

Russian Gold-Backed Crypto Slams the Global US Dollar Standard By CCN Markets: Russia is continuing to explore the possibility of a gold-backed cryptocurrency for use as a cross-border settlement alternative with other countries. Under heavy sanctions from the US, the potential of a value-pegged cryptocurrency could help Russia escape from the usage of the Dollar as a currency standard. Russia’s State Duma member Vladimir Gutenev proposed the creation of this digital asset. He suggested the tying of the value to gold would alleviate issues found in cryptocurrencies, and that this offering would be likened to a stable coin. Breaking US Dollar bonds Russia has honed in on gold reserves


3 Dangerous Money Lies You May Be Telling Yourself

3 Dangerous Money Lies You May Be Telling Yourself Any one of these misunderstandings could hurt your long-term financial health.


South Africa youth unemployment a "national crisis - president

South Africa youth unemployment a "national crisis - president Youth unemployment in South Africa has become a "national crisis", President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Sunday at an event commemorating youth activism during the apartheid era. Unemployment in Africa's most advanced economy has remained stubbornly high since white minority rule ended 25 years ago, and creating jobs is a major challenge for Ramaphosa as he aims to reignite an underperforming economy. Unemployment inched up to 27.6% in the first quarter, official data showed in May, underscoring the task faced by Ramaphosa after his ANC party won re-election last month.


New York judge dies after having a heart attack on the bench

New York judge dies after having a heart attack on the bench James Reitz, a 57-year-old judge from Mahopac, New York, died after suffering a heart attack in Putnam County Court.


UPDATE 2-Blast-hit tankers to be assessed off UAE coast

UPDATE 2-Blast-hit tankers to be assessed off UAE coast The two oil tankers crippled in attacks in the Gulf of Oman last week that Washington and Riyadh have blamed on Iran are being assessed off the coast off the United Arab Emirates before their cargos are unloaded, the ships' operators said on Sunday. Damage assessment on Japan's Kokuka Courageous and preparation for ship-to-ship transfer of its methanol cargo would start after authorities in Sharjah, one of the UAE's seven emirates, complete security checks, Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement said.


Tennis-Returning Sharapova inspired by 'ultimate fighter' Nadal

Tennis-Returning Sharapova inspired by 'ultimate fighter' Nadal Maria Sharapova says she will draw inspiration from Rafael Nadal's incredible powers of recovery as she resumes her injury-hit career on the Spanish great's island next week. The 32-year-old Russian has not played a competitive match since pulling out of the St Petersburg Open in January and underwent surgery on her right shoulder a few weeks later. Sharapova was already training on grass in the sunshine Balearic isle while Nadal was winning his record-extending 12th French Open last weekend, having battled back from knee injuries.


Surprise! Social Security Might Not Have Paid for Your Medicare

Surprise! Social Security Might Not Have Paid for Your Medicare An error gave recipients bigger checks than they should have gotten -- because they failed to withhold premium payments for healthcare coverage.


Inside Japan’s Oldest Whisky Distillery

Inside Japan’s Oldest Whisky Distillery Inside Japan’s Oldest Whisky Distillery


A Cannabis Credit Card? Yeah, That's a Real Thing Now

A Cannabis Credit Card? Yeah, That's a Real Thing Now This newly-public multistate dispensary operator has introduced its own marijuana credit card for consumers.


1 Stock That Pays You Each Month

1 Stock That Pays You Each Month This Canadian pipeline company provides its investors with a generous monthly payment.


4 of the 14 Most Widely Held Stocks on Investing App Robinhood Are Marijuana Stocks

4 of the 14 Most Widely Held Stocks on Investing App Robinhood Are Marijuana Stocks Millennials love cannabis stocks. Unfortunately, two of their favorites could be duds.


Want to Become Wealthy? Do This One Thing.

Want to Become Wealthy? Do This One Thing. Four simple words hold the key to reaching your financial dreams.


French, Malian forces kill 20 militants in operation: Mali army

French, Malian forces kill 20 militants in operation: Mali army Allied French and Malian forces killed 20 militants in an operation in a part of northern Mali where Islamic State operates, a spokesman for the West African nation's military said on Sunday. The operation in the district of Akabar, a remote part of a game reserve near the border with Niger and not far from the Malian city of Menaka, was continuing, army spokesman Colonel Diarran Kone said by telephone. Mali has become increasingly engulfed in violence since a Tuareg uprising in 2012 was hijacked by Islamist militants, prompting France to intervene to push them back the following year.


French, Malian forces kill 20 militants in operation-Mali army

French, Malian forces kill 20 militants in operation-Mali army Allied French and Malian forces killed 20 militants in an operation in a part of northern Mali where Islamic State operates, a spokesman for the West African nation's military said on Sunday. The operation in the district of Akabar, a remote part of a game reserve near the border with Niger and not far from the Malian city of Menaka, was continuing, army spokesman Colonel Diarran Kone said by telephone. Mali has become increasingly engulfed in violence since a Tuareg uprising in 2012 was hijacked by Islamist militants, prompting France to intervene to push them back the following year.


Damaged tankers reach safe waters after Gulf attacks

Damaged tankers reach safe waters after Gulf attacks Two damaged tankers arrived safely Sunday to locations off the Emirati coast after they were rocked by explosions in Gulf waters, in an incident Saudi Arabia blamed on its regional arch-rival Iran. The Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous was carrying highly flammable methanol through the Gulf of Oman on Thursday when it came under attack along with the Norwegian-operated Front Altair -- the second assault in a month in the strategic shipping lane. US President Donald Trump has said the operation had Iran "written all over it" -- rejecting Tehran's vehement denial -- and its key Gulf ally Saudi Arabia has also lashed out against Tehran.


Taking aim at Johnson, British PM hopefuls make Brexit case

Taking aim at Johnson, British PM hopefuls make Brexit case Several hopefuls vying to replace British Prime Minister Theresa May turned their fire on favourite Boris Johnson on Sunday, questioning his pledge to leave the European Union by the end of October no matter what. With former London mayor and foreign minister Johnson keeping a low profile, the other candidates have targeted the air waves to try to present their cases to lead the governing Conservative Party. Candidate after candidate on Sunday questioned his ability to navigate Britain's departure from the EU, saying his pledge to leave on Oct. 31 was nigh on impossible and would set Britain on track for a no deal Brexit.


UPDATE 1-Iran to scale back nuclear deal commitments - Tasnim

UPDATE 1-Iran to scale back nuclear deal commitments - Tasnim Iran will announce further moves on Monday to scale back compliance with an international nuclear pact that the United States abandoned last year, the semi-official Tasnim news agency reported on Sunday. "Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation tomorrow at the Arak heavy water site will announce preparatory steps that have been taken to further decrease Tehran's commitments under the deal," Tasnim said, without citing sources. The organisation will announce moves to increase stocks of enriched uranium and production of heavy water at Arak, Tasnim reported.


Pope urges restraint in Gulf after tanker attacks

Pope urges restraint in Gulf after tanker attacks Pope Francis called for restraint and a lowering of tensions in the Middle East on Sunday following attacks on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman that have raised fears of a broader confrontation in the region. Francis, during a visit to a city in central Italy that was severely damaged by a string of earthquakes in 2016, said he was worried by the ramifications of the attacks. "I invite everyone to use the instruments of diplomacy to resolve the complex problems of the conflicts in the Middle East," he said.


Cricket-Booing Warner, Smith can backfire for England - Anderson

Cricket-Booing Warner, Smith can backfire for England - Anderson Sledging and booing Australia's Steve Smith and David Warner during the English summer will only push the duo to improve their performance levels, England pace bowler James Anderson said. Smith and Warner were suspended for 12 months after a ball-tampering incident in South Africa last year and returned to international cricket at the World Cup.


UK Tories warned not to crown Boris Johnson without a fight

UK Tories warned not to crown Boris Johnson without a fight Candidates seeking to beat favorite Boris Johnson and become Britain's next prime minister warned Sunday that the Conservative Party needs a real leadership contest, not just a coronation for the flamboyant front-runner. Johnson, a former foreign secretary who has run a deliberately low-profile leadership campaign, was accused of trying to avoid scrutiny after he refused to take part in a televised debate Sunday night among the six candidates still in the race. An instantly recognizable figure, famous for his Latin quips and unruly blond hair, Johnson is admired by many Conservatives for his ability to energize voters.


UPDATE 1-Chinese regulators will restructure Baoshang Bank as soon as possible

UPDATE 1-Chinese regulators will restructure Baoshang Bank as soon as possible The Chinese government's takeover of Baoshang Bank has caused some pain but prevented bigger financial and social instability, and regulators will restructure the lender as soon as possible, a newspaper affiliated to China's central bank said on Sunday. Chinese regulators had completed debt repayment and transfer for Baoshang bank's big institutional and interbank clients as of June 7, and will move on to verify and evaluate the lender's assets ahead of the restructuring, according to the Financial News article, published on the People's Bank of China's (PBOC) website. Chinese financial regulators took control of Inner Mongolia-based Baoshang Bank on May 24 due to "serious" credit risks, rattling domestic markets and prompting PBOC to inject cash into the banking system.


20% of Baby Boomers Are Making This Huge Financial Mistake

20% of Baby Boomers Are Making This Huge Financial Mistake And it could really hurt them in retirement.


UPDATE 1-Extinction Rebellion delays drone protest at Britain's Heathrow until after summer

UPDATE 1-Extinction Rebellion delays drone protest at Britain's Heathrow until after summer Climate activism group Extinction Rebellion has postponed until later this year a plan to shut down Britain's Heathrow Airport using drones and published on Sunday more details of the protest action in a bid to allay public safety fears. "Extinction Rebellion will not be carrying out any actions at Heathrow Airport in June or July this year," the group said in a statement. Heathrow Airport responded to the group's announcement by repeating its previous warning that any use of drones near the airport would be a "reckless action" that could endanger lives.


Deadline looms for agreement on Swiss-EU ties

Deadline looms for agreement on Swiss-EU ties Swiss ties with the European Union, its biggest trading partner, face a critical test this week as Brussels decides whether the two sides have made enough progress on a stalled draft treaty to head off punitive measures set to start at the end of June. After more than four years of negotiations produced a draft text in November, the Swiss government this month tentatively endorsed the accord but said it needed clarifications on three areas -- protecting Swiss wages, regulating state aid, and spelling out citizens' rights -- before it could sign off. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker -- whose term ends on Oct. 31 -- responded that he was prepared to clear up any questions but wanted this done by Tuesday, when the Commission reviews relations with Switzerland.


China stays mum as Hong Kong protests against extradition bill

China stays mum as Hong Kong protests against extradition bill Chinese state media remained largely silent Sunday as hundreds of thousands of Hong Kong people took to the streets to protest against a controversial extradition bill, with social platforms scrubbed clean of any pictures or mentions of the rally. Hong Kong's government has been rocked in recent days by massive demonstrations -- and some violence -- which forced the city's embattled leader to indefinitely suspend passage of the bill. Critics fear the Beijing-backed law will entangle people in China's notoriously opaque and politicised courts and damage the city's reputation as a safe place for business.


Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods, throw party instead

Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods, throw party instead The Happy Spot was a little depressed. Dozens of corn farmers and those who sell them seed, chemicals and equipment gathered on Thursday at the restaurant in Deer Grove, Illinois, after heavy rains caused unprecedented delays in planting this year and contributed to record floods across the central United States. James McCune, a farmer from Mineral, Illinois, was unable to plant 85% of his intended corn acres and wanted to commiserate with his fellow farmers by hosting the "Prevent Plant Party" at The Happy Spot.


Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods, throw party instead

Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods, throw party instead The Happy Spot was a little depressed. Dozens of corn farmers and those who sell them seed, chemicals and equipment gathered on Thursday at the restaurant in Deer Grove, Illinois, after heavy rains caused unprecedented delays in planting this year and contributed to record floods across the central United States. James McCune, a farmer from Mineral, Illinois, was unable to plant 85% of his intended corn acres and wanted to commiserate with his fellow farmers by hosting the "Prevent Plant Party" at The Happy Spot.


Massive demonstration chokes Hong Kong as extradition anger boils

Massive demonstration chokes Hong Kong as extradition anger boils Hundreds of thousands of people rallied in central Hong Kong Sunday against a reviled extradition law, the latest huge demonstration to pile pressure on the city's embattled leader, despite her weekend climbdown. The enormous show of force saw protesters chanting "Scrap the evil law!" as they marched through the streets calling for the resignation of chief executive Carrie Lam, who paused work on the hugely divisive bill Saturday after days of mounting pressure, saying she had misjudged the public mood. Throngs of black-clad protesters snaked their way through the city's streets in dense crowds heading to the city's parliament -- a repeat of a record-breaking demonstration a week earlier that organisers said more than a million people attended.


Saudi Crown Prince Says Aramco's Planned IPO Is On Track

Saudi Crown Prince Says Aramco's Planned IPO Is On Track The world’s top crude exporter aims to offer Aramco stock on its domestic exchange and at least one international bourse, with the prince projecting the company’s value at about $2 trillion. Aramco’s financial performance, revealed in April, indicated a valuation closer to $1.2 trillion if investors judge it by the same metrics as other giant oil companies. “We are committed to the Aramco IPO, given the proper circumstances and the right time,” the crown prince said in an interview with Asharq Al Awsat newspaper published Sunday.


G20 agrees to tackle ocean plastic waste

G20 agrees to tackle ocean plastic waste Group of 20 environment ministers agreed on Sunday to adopt a new implementation framework for actions to tackle the issue of marine plastic waste on a global scale, the Japanese government said after hosting the two-day ministerial meeting. Environment and energy ministers of the Group of 20 major economies met this weekend in Karuizawa, northwest of Tokyo, ahead of the G20 summit in Osaka, western Japan, on June 28-29. One of the top issues was ocean plastic waste as images of plastic debris-strewn beaches and dead animals with stomachs full of plastic have sparked outrage, with many countries banning plastic bags outright.


G20 agrees to tackle ocean plastic waste

G20 agrees to tackle ocean plastic waste Group of 20 environment ministers agreed on Sunday to adopt a new implementation framework for actions to tackle the issue of marine plastic waste on a global scale, the Japanese government said after hosting the two-day ministerial meeting. Environment and energy ministers of the Group of 20 major economies met this weekend in Karuizawa, northwest of Tokyo, ahead of the G20 summit in Osaka, western Japan, on June 28-29. One of the top issues was ocean plastic waste as images of plastic debris-strewn beaches and dead animals with stomachs full of plastic have sparked outrage, with many countries banning plastic bags outright.


Iran to scale back nuclear deal commitments: Tasnim

Iran to scale back nuclear deal commitments: Tasnim Iran will announce further moves on Monday to scale back compliance with an international nuclear pact that the United States abandoned last year, the semi-official Tasnim news agency reported on Sunday. "Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation tomorrow at the Arak heavy water site will announce preparatory steps that have been taken to further decrease Tehran's commitments under the deal," Tasnim said, without citing sources. The organization will announce moves to increase stocks of enriched uranium and production of heavy water at Arak, Tasnim reported.


Will Democrats Learn Their Lesson before 2020?

Will Democrats Learn Their Lesson before 2020? Washington -- "It is a great advantage to a president," said the 30th of them, "and a major source of safety to the country, for him to know he is not a great man." Or, Calvin Coolidge would say today, a great woman. While today's incumbent advertises himself as an "extremely stable genius" and those who would replace him promise national transformation, attention should be paid to the granular details of presidential politics, which suggest that a politics of modesty might produce voting changes where they matter, and at least 270 electoral votes for a Democrat.If the near future resembles the immediate past, which it often does, the Democratic nominee in 2020 will be, as the Republican nominee was in 2016, the person favored by the party faction for whom government is more a practical than an ideological concern. For Republicans in 2016, the faction -- non-college whites -- felt itself a casualty of an economic dynamism that has most benefited people who admire this faction least. In 2020, the decisive Democratic faction in the nomination contest is apt to be, as it was in 2016, African Americans, whose appraisal of government is particularly practical: What will it do regarding health care, employment, schools?For them, packing the Supreme Court, impeaching the president, abolishing the Electoral College and other gesture-promises probably are distractions. African Americans were at least 20 percent of the vote in 15 of the 2016 primaries, and in all the primaries combined they gave 76 percent of their votes to Hillary Clinton. This is why Trump did not get a chance to defeat Vermont senator Bernie Sanders, who narrowly defeated Clinton among white voters in the primaries.These numbers are from the National Journal's Josh Kraushaar, who noted that in a 2016 Pew survey, 'just 28% of African-American Democrats identify as liberal, with a plurality describing themselves as moderate.' Some of that plurality surely resent the idea of reparations for slavery as a badge of an irremediable damage. And the importance of ensuring robust African American turnout for Democrats is illustrated by this fact: If in 2004 John Kerry had received as many black votes in Ohio as Barack Obama was to receive in 2008, Kerry would have been the 44th president.Furthermore, in the 110-day sprint between the end of the Democratic nominating convention in Milwaukee and Election Day, the earliest voting -- this is subject to change -- begins September 18 in Minnesota and at least one-fifth of 2020 voters will probably cast their ballots before Election Day. The decisive voters might be those who crave not transformation but restoration -- the recovery of national governance that is neither embarrassing nor exhausting.So, the Democratic party, the world's oldest party, which for the first time in its history has won the popular vote in six of seven presidential elections, should be keenly focused on how to subtract states from Donald Trump's 2016 roster, and to do so by carrying more than the 487 counties (out of 3,142) that Clinton carried. Democrats might try to decipher the almost 41-point swing in northeast Iowa's inscrutable Howard County, the only U.S. county that voted in a landslide for Obama over Mitt Romney (by 20.9 points) in 2012 and four years later in a landslide for Trump over Clinton (by 20.1 points).Democrats must make amends with the 402 other counties that voted for Trump after voting for Obama at least once. This will require the Democrats' progressive lions to lay down with the Democrats' moderate lambs, a spectacle as biblical as it is inimical to progressives' pride about their wokeness. They might, however, be encouraged to be more politically ecumenical by remembering this: In 2016, Clinton won cumulatively a million more votes than Obama did in 2012 in New York, Massachusetts and California, but won one million fewer than he received everywhere else.Everything, however, depends on Democrats jettisoning, before they allow it to influence their selection of a candidate, their self-flattering explanation of 2016. As William Voegeli, senior editor of the Claremont Review of Books, has written:> Ascribing the 2016 election to your opponents' bigotry makes clear that the problem was not that Democrats didn't do enough to deserve people's votes, but that the people weren't good enough to deserve Democrats' governance. . . . One imagines that, sooner rather than later, even Democrats will come to suspect that denigrating people until they vote for you lacks a certain strategic plausibility.Sooner than the Milwaukee convention?(c) 2019, Washington Post Writers Group


New Parents Need Paid Family Leave, and Here’s a Bill to Provide It

New Parents Need Paid Family Leave, and Here’s a Bill to Provide It The most important role that God has gifted me in life is that of being a father. Nothing can prepare you for the sheer rush of love and joy that comes with the privilege of being a parent.There is also nothing that prepares new parents for the sudden and extreme change in schedules and finances that comes with starting a family. And for far too many new parents across our nation, the sad reality is that they are forced to take on new debt or fall onto welfare programs just to pay for their basic living costs after having a child. New mothers feel pressured to return to work too soon after giving birth, and new fathers are often unable to take time off to spend those critical first few weeks with their child.You cannot have a strong country without strong communities, and it’s impossible to have strong communities without strong families. Our current economic policies have left young, working families behind, even as our marriage and childbirth rates are falling. To address the problems facing families in the 21st century, we must realign our economic policies in support of American families.That is why I, along with Senator Mitt Romney (R., Utah) and Representatives Ann Wagner (R., Mo.) and Dan Crenshaw (R., Texas), introduced the New Parents Act, which would provide a voluntary option for paid family leave. The bill would ensure an economic safety net that new parents could take advantage of, by allowing them to pull forward from their future Social Security benefits. No new taxes. No new mandates. No new regulations. Completely optional.But what really sets my bill apart is that it gives new parents much-needed flexibility in how they choose to use their paid leave. It would be available to working and stay-at-home moms and dads alike, allowing them to create a paid-leave plan that works best for their household. Most important, at a time when just over one in ten workers receives paid family leave from their employers, my bill gives millions of new parents the ability to take paid leave that they otherwise would never have.Nothing is more critical for the future health and long-term prosperity of our nation than investing in families. Families are the pillars of our communities and our nation. Often, fathers are left out of the conversation when we talk about the modern American family. Traditionally, mothers are viewed as the primary caregiver. For some families, it’s still that way today.Recently, fathers have begun to be included in discussions about paid family leave. As a father of four, I know the importance of having flexibility in those first few months. I would take on the late-night feedings when our children were newborns. When I had to take the long trip to Tallahassee while serving in the Florida legislature, Jeanette would stay at home with our kids. We were also blessed to be surrounded by family, who readily stepped in when we needed them.Today, many middle-class families in America do not have the luxury of one parent’s being able to stay at home. The flexibility my bill offers ensures that parents can continue working full-time or part-time, using the extra funds to pay for child-care expenses. No one should be economically penalized for choosing to start a family. No parents should have to go into debt to give their child proper care in those critical first few months.As millions around the country celebrate Father’s Day, I urge my colleagues, who know that being a parent is the greatest job we will ever have, to support my New Parents Act and join my effort to pass a national paid-family-leave program.


Free meals, treats and discounts for Dad: Here's where to score for Father's Day

Free meals, treats and discounts for Dad: Here's where to score for Father's Day Need ideas for Father's Day? Many restaurants are helping families honor Dad with free treats, discounts, brunches and other meals Sunday.


Can a Small Italian Village Point the Way to More Livable Modern Cities?

Can a Small Italian Village Point the Way to More Livable Modern Cities? Artena, Italy is approximately 25 miles from Rome. Despite their proximity to each other, Artena is a much sleepier, old-world village, not encumbered by Rome’s foot traffic or consumerism. The beauty of Artena is in its organic simplicity, and its rebellion against the capricious whims of technology that have influenced city planning and development everywhere else. Its streets are narrow, walkable, and not perfectly paved with cement or painted with traffic signs. And, similarly to Rome, it’s inspiring.Artena is “human-centered,” Stefano Serafini says. Serafini is a director of the International Society of Biourbanism, a group headquartered in Artena that focuses on our urban environments as an organism, and, through research, aims to realize optimal environmental enhancements for cities based on human needs. What that looks like in practice is at the heart of the Biourbanism Summer School, a week-long event I will attend and report on next month. I won’t be the only foreigner in attendance — the school is attracting a diverse group of writers, architects, artists, politicians, economists, and citizens from across the world. Serafini describes the variety of attendees each year as a “unique and different symphony.”The teachers and participants at the school will bring their expertise to Artena, the small town that serves as both a forum for discussion about building cities that satiate the human spirit and an example of how such cities are developed. Serafini tells me that hosting the event in Artena is fundamental to the school, because the town has retained a character that we can’t find in many other places in the world:> It is a real “common space,” and one can feel it by passing through it, not to mention by inhabiting it. This experience is a fundamental part of the school and that's why all participants will live here for the whole week. . . . Its beauty is not decorative or “aesthetic.” Its beauty has a meaning. Contemporary built places very often lack meaning and thus real beauty, because our modern lives often lack purpose. And yet we all long for something we often do not even have words for. So Artena can help us uttering or building words we cannot find anywhere else in our world.While communication at the school will primarily be in Italian and English, perhaps the most important language is the unspoken one of the built environment — the one Artena will use to speak with attendees. This theme of language is central to the school, and more generally, architecture, Serafini insists. Post-modernity, with its severe geometry, unnatural dimensions, and alienating scale has stripped us of local vernacular and rootedness:> Post-modernity tends to corrode such a meaning-bearing entity, it tends to hollow it, and to substitute it with mere signs, to substitute semantics with syntax. Instead of communicating (i.e. instead of sharing our being), we rather transmit inputs, we command to each other, in other words, we fight for power. Look at what happens in social media. Look at what happens in conflict zones. It is the same logic of transmission/control vs communication/listening. Design as well can be conflictual and imperialistic or listening and communicative.While I’ll be attending in a professional capacity as a journalist, I’ll also be attending as an American in search of a solution to the problems many of our cities face today. The addition of bike lanes is a sign that many cities across the country are realizing the harmful effects of urban planning that only accommodates vehicles. Our health, mentally and physically, is a casualty of the urban-design crisis. So is our sense of local belonging in urban environments that often alienate us from our own neighbors, stripped as they are of public squares and walkable streets.These concerns about identity and interaction cross nationalities, as many of the teachers at the school demonstrate.Syrian architect Marwa al-Sabouni is one such teacher. Coming from a conflict zone, al-Sabouni will describe the extent to which architecture can influence culture and social fabric — her book, The Battle for Home: The Vision of a Young Architect in Syria, details the unraveling of Syrian cities in the war that ravaged the country. Other participants include Fabio Rampelli, the vice president of the Italian parliament, Goç Izleme, a Kurdish movie director and journalist, and Melek Aksoy, a Turkish fashion expert and historian. The kaleidoscope of attendees is, much like the location, intended to emphasize the holistic approach necessary for humane architectural change.I expect this summer school to be one that reminds me, as someone who has grown resigned to American cities designed with seemingly little thought to the human desire for identity and attachment, that solutions exist. They exist in places such as Artena, rebuilt in the 15th century, which rebels against the hegemony of the car and its demands on our cities, encouraging those who walk through the streets to unburden themselves of the modern world’s baggage.“The school wants to open our eyes on what really matters,” Serafini says. “Which in architecture means knowing what is right and what is wrong when designing a place for ourselves, our human fellows, and other creatures, and the common environment.”


Police: Off-duty officer shot man who hit him in Costco

Police: Off-duty officer shot man who hit him in Costco An off-duty police officer opened fire inside a Costco Wholesale warehouse store, killing a man who had attacked him and wounding two others, the Corona Police Department said. Kenneth French, 32, of Riverside assaulted the Los Angeles Police Department officer Friday night while he was holding his young child, the department said in a statement Saturday. The shooting prompted a stampede of frightened shoppers to flee the store east of Los Angeles and seek cover inside.


RPT-Cricket-India and Pakistan rivalry renewed under grey English skies

RPT-Cricket-India and Pakistan rivalry renewed under grey English skies Noisy India and Pakistan cricket fans brought a taste of the subcontinent to Manchester on Sunday, their enthusiasm undimmed by the threat of rain looming over a World Cup match between the regional rivals that will draw a massive global audience. Pakistan have never beaten India in a World Cup but Sarfaraz Ahmed's men received encouragement from Prime Minister Imran Khan, the former cricketer who led the country to their maiden World Cup trophy in 1992.