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Appeals court blocks California gas facility from reopening

Appeals court blocks California gas facility from reopening LOS ANGELES (AP) — A California appeals court judge temporarily blocked a Los Angeles natural gas storage facility Friday from reopening a year and a half after a major blowout spewed methane that drove thousands of families from their homes.


Video shows border officers' actions and inactions resulted in tragic 2013 incident

Video shows border officers' actions and inactions resulted in tragic 2013 incident Government surveillance video shows border officers appeared to encourage, or at least allow, teen to drink from a bottle containing concentrated liquid methamphetamine.


On Titan, the Building Blocks of Bizarre Life Might Rain from the Sky

On Titan, the Building Blocks of Bizarre Life Might Rain from the Sky Vinyl cyanide could make viable cellular membranes in the conditions found on Saturn's moon Titan, according to new research.


Sony a7S II shoots stunning footage of Earth at night from the ISS

Sony a7S II shoots stunning footage of Earth at night from the ISS The low-light capability of the Sony a7S II is allowing for some stunning shots of Earth at night, now that the camera is aboard the ISS. It is being used to monitor changes on earth from outer space.


Watchdog group seeks probe into EPA chief Pruitt's travel

Watchdog group seeks probe into EPA chief Pruitt's travel OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An ethics watchdog group filed a complaint asking for an investigation into Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt's frequent flights to his home state of Oklahoma at taxpayer expense.


The Best Pocket Knife for Every Situation

Robot that dived into Washington, D.C., fountain not victim of 'foul play'

Robot that dived into Washington, D.C., fountain not victim of 'foul play' Its Silicon Valley-based maker, Knightscope Inc., said data from STEVE's "black box," as well as video and tests, showed the unscheduled water stop was caused not by foul play or rain, but by an algorithm failing to detect the uneven surface, resulting in a skid. "...Developing state-of-the-art autonomous technology must be done in real-world environments. It is not commercially reasonable to be developed in constrained laboratory settings," Knightscope said in a statement.


Does the 2040 ban on new petrol and diesel cars mean the death of biofuels?

Does the 2040 ban on new petrol and diesel cars mean the death of biofuels? The great dream of cars running on sustainable petrol has not bitten the dust. Here's why.


Stoned Plus Buzzed: Mixing Caffeine and Pot Brings New Risks

Stoned Plus Buzzed: Mixing Caffeine and Pot Brings New Risks Eighty percent of Americans get a daily jolt from caffeine, and now, as marijuana legalization has spread across the nation, some users and businesses have begun touting a combination of the two drugs. It's important to keep in mind that the caffeine in a regular cup of coffee or tea is a pretty powerful psychoactive drug, meaning it’s capable of affecting the mind, emotions and behavior, Dr. Sergi Ferre, a senior investigator at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), told Live Science. Caffeine exerts its effects by blocking receptors in the brain for a neurotransmitter called adenosine, Ferre told Live Science.


Which body part hurts the most when stung by a bee? A scientist put himself through a torturous experiment to find out

Which body part hurts the most when stung by a bee? A scientist put himself through a torturous experiment to find out Pain is notoriously subjective — some people can take more of it than others. But we...


Bright lights and feelings of peace - why are so many near-death experiences so similar?

Bright lights and feelings of peace - why are so many near-death experiences so similar? It’s not a myth – a lot of people who’ve got very close to clinical death do actually see ‘bright lights’ ahead, as well as a feeling of peace and disconnection from their own body. Belgian researchers analysed 154 near-death narratives from the International Association for Near-Death Studies and the Coma Science Group. The researchers found that many near-death experiences shared the same features – with 80% saying they felt peaceful and 69% seeing a bright light.


New species of dinosaur found in China - and it looks like a turkey

New species of dinosaur found in China - and it looks like a turkey A new species of dinosaur bearing more than a passing resemblance to a turkey has been found in China. Known as a Corythoraptor jacobi, the flesh eating winged creature roamed Earth at the same time as the T-Rex, standing about 10 feet tall on its hind legs and weighing about 37 stone. The almost complete skeleton of Corythoraptor jacobi, including its skull and jaw, was unearthed at a construction site in Ganzhou, southern China.


SpaceX Is Now Valued at $21 Billion

SpaceX Is Now Valued at $21 Billion Elon Musk’s SpaceX is now worth in excess of $21 billion, making it one of the most valuable privately held companies in the world.


4 Places You Can Still Find Eyewear for Viewing the Solar Eclipse Safely

4 Places You Can Still Find Eyewear for Viewing the Solar Eclipse Safely The total solar eclipse of 2017 is now less than a month away. The term “solar eclipse” is often used to describe both total solar eclipses and partial solar eclipses, which can cause confusion about viewing safety. Technically, a total solar eclipse occurs when the moon completely covers the sun, when viewed from Earth.


Study disproves the Bible's suggestion that the ancient Canaanites were wiped out

Study disproves the Bible's suggestion that the ancient Canaanites were wiped out The ancient Canaanites were not wiped out, as the Bible suggests, but went on to become modern-day Lebanese, a study has found. Living between 3,000 and 4,000 years ago, the holy text suggests things did not end well for the people living in the Middle East.  According to a passage in Deuteronomy, God had ordered the Israelites to exterminate the Canaanites. “You shall not leave alive anything that breathes. But you shall utterly destroy them ... so that they may not teach you to do according to all their detestable things which they have done for their gods.” It seems they didn't destroy them all, though. Examining the DNA of the region's ancient and modern inhabitants, the scientists found more than 90 per cent of the ancestry of modern-day Lebanese derived from the Canaanites. The temple of Bacchus in Lebanon's Beqaa Valley, built by the Canaanites Credit: EPA “The Bible reports the destruction of the Canaanite cities and the annihilation of its people; if true, the Canaanites could not have directly contributed genetically to present-day populations,” the researchers wrote in the American Journal of Human Genetics. “However, no archaeological evidence has so far been found to support widespread destruction of Canaanite cities between the Bronze and Iron Ages: cities on the Levant coast such as Sidon and Tyre show continuity of occupation until the present day. “We show that present-day Lebanese derive most of their ancestry from a Canaanite-related population, which therefore implies substantial genetic continuity in the Levant since at least the Bronze Age.” The scientists came to the conclusion by comparing five whole genomes, obtained from the base of skulls from ancient remains found in the area of Sidon, with those of 99 Lebanese living in the region today. "One of the most exciting parts of the research was to get DNA out of the specimens," one of the researchers, Chris Tyler-Smith, told the ABC. The modern-day Lebanese are "likely to be direct descendants of the Canaanites" said Dr Marc Haber, of The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, according to the Independent. "But they have in addition a small proportion of Eurasian ancestry that may have arrived via conquests by distant populations such as the Assyrians, Persians, or Macedonians.”


Multitasking: How Good Are You at Juggling Tasks?

Multitasking: How Good Are You at Juggling Tasks? We all have a lot on our plates these days, which means multitasking is a daily requirement. But do you know how efficient you actually are?


Prosecutor: Martin Shkreli repeatedly lied to investors

Prosecutor: Martin Shkreli repeatedly lied to investors Wealthy investors say former biotech CEO Martin Shkreli told them he was managing tens of millions of dollars' worth of investments, that they were making double-digit returns and they could withdraw their ...


Expedition team heads to mysterious underwater continent of Zealandia

Expedition team heads to mysterious underwater continent of Zealandia For millions of years, the underwater continent of Zealandia has done its own thing. Once part of Australia, it broke off from the country about 75 million years ago and moved northeast. It stopped moving 53 million years ago, but recently the mysterious continent has attracted a lot of attention.  SEE ALSO: Two storms set to undergo bizarre 'Fujiwhara' dance, leaving only 1 standing in the end On Friday, a team of researchers led by the Australian National University will embark on a two-month-long expedition to examine Zealandia, a 4.9-million square kilometer (1.9-million square mile) chunk of land now mostly submerged underwater. Zealandia is made up of submerged continental crust, and would connect the islands of New Zealand and New Caledonia — if you removed the ocean water around them.  "The continental crust of Zealandia was thinned by stretching before it separated from Australia so that it lies lower than Australia," Professor Rupert Sutherland, from Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, said in a statement. "Zealandia's continental crust is thicker than the surrounding oceanic crust, and so it lies higher than that." It's hoped the trip will provide more clues about the global tectonic configuration, and how the "Ring of Fire" — a large area in the Pacific Ocean that is a hotbed for earthquakes and volcanoes — came to exist. Researchers on board the drill ship JOIDES Resolution will examine extracted rock core samples, useful in the study of oceanographic history, extreme climates, and plate tectonics.  The JOIDES Resolution.Image: ANUThe region is also vital for studying changes in global climate and oceanography. "As Australia moved north and the Tasman Sea developed, global circulation patterns changed and water depths over Zealandia fluctuated. This region was important in influencing global changes," Professor Jerry Dickens, from Rice University, said in a statement. The research is part of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), an international drilling program which involves 23 countries.  Preliminary results of the expedition will be available at the end of September, when the ship docks in Hobart. WATCH: Forget smart watches, this voice-powered smart ring will make you look very extra


Early Stage: SF startup unleashes new feat in genetic engineering

Early Stage: SF startup unleashes new feat in genetic engineering Ravata Solutions says its method is more efficient for injecting genetic modifiers into mice, which means new drugs can come to market sooner.


Indonesia orangutan sanctuary says villagers encroaching

Indonesia orangutan sanctuary says villagers encroaching JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — A conservation group says nearly a fifth of the forest in an orangutan sanctuary on the Indonesian part of Borneo has been taken over by people, threatening efforts to rehabilitate the critically endangered great apes for release into the wild.


MIT Researchers Just Got One Huge Step Closer to a Quantum Computer

MIT Researchers Just Got One Huge Step Closer to a Quantum Computer The secret? Ultra-cold, two-atom molecules: the stable "qubits" we've been looking for.


A plane-size asteroid buzzes by Earth undetected

A plane-size asteroid buzzes by Earth undetected A big space rock slipped right by us last week and was only spotted as it left our cosmic neighborhood.


Professor Einstein: Your Personal Genius educational toy review

Professor Einstein: Your Personal Genius educational toy review We took Professor Einstein, an educational robot aimed at teaching teens about science, for a spin. Find out how we got on.


Rare birds, wildflowers: 'Secret garden' opens after century

Rare birds, wildflowers: 'Secret garden' opens after century TRUCKEE, Calif. (AP) — Pink and yellow wildflowers burst from a lush bed of grass hidden from public view for more than a century. Towering trees and snow-capped mountains encircle the wild meadow, beckoning visitors to a largely untouched piece of California's Sierra Nevada.


Could shark blood aid in chemical weapon detection?

Could shark blood aid in chemical weapon detection? The U.S. military is investigating whether a protein in shark blood can help hunt for chemical and biological weapons and reveal them before they harm military personnel


Future Sunscreen May Contain DNA — and It Gets Better the Longer You Wear It

Future Sunscreen May Contain DNA — and It Gets Better the Longer You Wear It Medical innovators have developed a coating made of DNA that improves its ability to protect skin from harmful UV light the longer it’s exposed to the sun.


US scientists have genetically modified human embryos

US scientists have genetically modified human embryos U.S. scientists have genetically modified human embryos.


Slimy slug mucus inspires glue which can mend internal injuries without stitches

Slimy slug mucus inspires glue which can mend internal injuries without stitches Slimy slug mucus has inspired a new glue which can stick to slippery surfaces in the body and could end the need for stitches. For decades, scientists have attempted to invent an adhesive which can repair tears in bodily tissues, which are often covered in blood. Super-glue has been used for decades to close wounds, but it has never been able to help with internal injuries because it is too toxic to cells and will not stick to tissue. Now researchers at Imperial College London and scientists in the US have created a super-strong glue which is a tough as cartilage, but which can cling internal organs. The design is based on slug mucus from the Dusky Arion species, which oozes a special kind of slime which prevents predators prying it from a surface. A new, flexible adhesive material inspired by the glue secreted by slugs adheres to biological tissues (even when wet) without causing toxicity, and can be formed into either sheets (teal blue) or custom shapes (dark blue) Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University The slug slime is so effective because it contains positively charged proteins, which are attracted to the ground, or wall. To create a similar mucus, the scientists made a water-based gel with positively charged molecules protruding from the surface, which create a static attraction with the negatively charged cells in the body. "Nature has frequently already found elegant solutions to common problems,” said Donald Ingber, Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School. “It's a matter of knowing where to look and recognizing a good idea when you see one. “We are excited to see how this technology, inspired by a humble slug, might develop into a new technology for surgical repair and wound healing." Slugs stick to surfaces by using positively charged slime Credit:  Tim Gainey / Alamy/Slugs stick to surfaces by using positively charged slime The researchers tested their glue on dry and wet pig skin, cartilage, arteries, and tissue from the heart and liver, and found that it bound to all of them. The adhesive also maintained its bonding when implanted into rats for two weeks, or when used to seal a hole in a pig heart that was mechanically inflated and deflated and then subjected to tens of thousands of cycles of stretching. It also caused no tissue damage when applied to a liver hemorrhage in mice, which would usually be closed by stitches. The new glue could act like a patch or be injected to seal a larger wound Researchers believe it could be turned into a sticky patch, like a sticking plaster,  that can be cut to size and applied to tissue surfaces or as an injectable solution for deeper injuries. "This family of tough adhesives has wide-ranging applications," said Dr Adam Celiz, of the Department of Bioengineering at Imperial. "We can make these adhesives out of biodegradable materials, so they decompose once they've served their purpose. “We could even combine this technology with soft robotics to make sticky robots, or with pharmaceuticals to make a new vehicle for drug delivery." The team of researchers also included the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). It was was published in the journal Science.


This Pattern on CenturyLink Has My Attention

This Pattern on CenturyLink Has My Attention Be a buyer of CTL at current levels, risking a close below $21.


Evacuees return home after France fires tamed

Evacuees return home after France fires tamed Bormes-les-Mimosas (France) (AFP) - Huge fires that forced mass evacuations in southern France were under control Thursday, allowing holidaymakers and residents in the worst-hit area to return to their accommodation and homes. Blazes that raged in hills around the village of Bormes-les-Mimosas, near beaches popular with tourists on the Cote d'Azur, forced 10,000 people to be evacuated from the region overnight Tuesday. Hundreds of firefighters and a fleet of planes dropping water on the burning trees and bushland have contained the blazes, meaning people who spent two nights in emergency centres or sleeping on beaches could return home.


The Surprising Passion Project Shared By 5 of the World’s Billionaires

The Surprising Passion Project Shared By 5 of the World’s Billionaires Bezos. Musk. Zuckerberg. All the cool billionaires are doing it.


NASA delays satellite launch to replace damaged antenna

NASA delays satellite launch to replace damaged antenna NASA has delayed the launch of a communications satellite by more than two weeks to replace a damaged antenna


NASA X-Plane: Supersonic Passenger Jet Quieter Than a Truck Could Halve Flight Times

NASA X-Plane: Supersonic Passenger Jet Quieter Than a Truck Could Halve Flight Times Bidding is set to open next month for construction of a “low boom” plane that can break the sound barrier (761 miles per hour), NASA told Bloomberg. Over the next few years, more people are expected to want to travel farther by air, which “will drive the demand for broadly available faster air travel,” Peter Coen, project manager for NASA’s commercial supersonic research team, said. The agency awarded the design of a low boom supersonic aircraft to researchers last year, and in June a smaller-scale model of its X-plane design passed wind tunnel tests.


A photo collection imagines the future of the Maasai people in space

A photo collection imagines the future of the Maasai people in space A young boy carrying a spear, a stick, and a blackheaded lamb walks into a clouded, celestial horizon. A woman, decked in traditional Maasai bead jewelry, identifies as a cyborg. And a man, wearing checkered traditional garments, floats in a surreal underwater seascape. These digital collages by the Kenyan digital artist and photographer Jacque Njeri…


L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation

L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation A man wipes off the headlights of the L.L. Bean Bootmobile in the parking lot at the facility where the famous outdoor boot is made. L.L. Bean is pushing back against a boycott led by a group urging consumers not to shop at retailers that support President-elect Donald Trump after it was revealed that Linda Bean, heir of the Maine-based company’s founder, had donated to a political action committee that helped elect Trump. “We are deeply troubled by the portrayal of L.L. Bean as a supporter of any political agenda,” Shawn Gorman, L.L. Bean’s executive chairman, said in a statement posted to Facebook late Sunday.


Union leader who says Trump lied about Carrier deal refuses to back down

Union leader who says Trump lied about Carrier deal refuses to back down Trump tours a Carrier factory in Indianapolis, Dec. 1, 2016. Chuck Jones, the union leader who claims President-elect Donald Trump lied to Carrier employees while touting a deal to keep jobs in the U.S., says he started receiving harassing phone calls a half hour after Trump slammed him on Twitter. “I’ve been doing this job for 30 years,” Jones, president of the United Steelworkers Local 1999, told CNN on Thursday morning.


Working, eating and sleeping at the office

Working, eating and sleeping at the office The sight of workers sleeping on the job is common in China, where a surplus of cheap labor can lead to downtime and employees at startup companies work long hours.


Obama seeks ‘irreversible’ opening to Cuba

Obama seeks ‘irreversible’ opening to Cuba This story is part of a weeklong Yahoo series marking one year since the opening of relations between the United States and Cuba.


The Last Days Of Streit's, New York's Jewish Willy Wonka Factory

Photographer Joseph O. Holmes photographs the last days of the 90-year-old Manhattan matzo factory. Located on Rivington Street on Manhattan's Lower East Side, Streit's Matzo Factory has been pumping out as much as 900 pounds of matzo an hour to feed New York's Jewish community for almost a century. After 90 years, though, Streit's is closing-up shop, shutting down its Manhattan factory and ...

Propeller kills factory worker

A 26-year-old factory worker was killed when he was hit by a propeller when the machine he was cleaning reportedly got switched on unintentionally.

Union might postpone vote seeking to organize Boeing's South Carolina plant

By Alwyn Scott NORTH CHARLESTON, South Carolina (Reuters) - Labor union officials say they could postpone a vote seeking to organize 3,000 workers at Boeing Co's factory here in South Carolina if their campaign fails to gain enough traction against fierce opposition from the company and local politicians. Organizers for the International Association of Machinists (IAM) are going door-to-door ...

Union might postpone vote seeking to organise Boeing's South Carolina plant

Labour union officials say they could postpone a vote seeking to organise 3,000 workers at Boeing Co's factory here in South Carolina if their campaign fails to gain enough traction against fierce opposition from the company and local politicians.     Organizers for the International Association of Machinists (IAM) are going door-to-door this week to gauge backing for the April 22 vote, and to ...

Film industry hopes Wednesday rally makes government ‘rethink’ tax credit cut

A film industry rep is expecting one of the biggest rallies in the province’s history Wednesday as talks between the industry and government on the film tax credit continue. Screen Nova Scotia chair, Marc Almon, and other industry members met … Continue Reading

Nova Scotia film industry hopeful about tax credit after meeting with government

Nova Scotia's film industry maintained pressure Tuesday on the provincial government over a change to its film tax credit, although the sides emerged from a meeting with different interpretations over a potential compromise. Key industry players expressed some optimism, describing a two-hour meeting with Finance Minister Diana Whalen and her officials as productive. Screen Nova Scotia chairman ...

Industry: Digital music sales match physical for 1st time

LONDON (AP) — Revenue from digital music matched that from physical albums and discs for the first time in 2014, a global industry body said Tuesday.

Fitch: Strong Results Expected for Hospital Industry in 1Q15

Continued strength in organic growth in volumes of patients experienced by the acute care hospital industry is likely to help maintain strong for-profit hospital earnings, according to Fitch Ratings.

Deinove: The Industrial Advantages of Deinove's Deinococcus Highlighted by the American Magazine Journal of Applied ...

MONTPELLIER, France -- DEINOVE (Alternext Paris: ALDEI), a biotech company developing innovative processes for producing biofuels and bio-based chemicals by using Deinococcus bacteria as host strains, ...

Deinove: The Industrial Advantages of Deinove's Deiococcus Highlighted by the American Magazine Journal of Applied ...

MONTPELLIER, France -- DEINOVE (Alternext Paris: ALDEI), a biotech company developing innovative processes for producing biofuels and bio-based chemicals by using Deinococcus bacteria as host strains, ...

Industrial Property Trust Announces First Quarter 2015 Acquisition Activity

DENVER -- Industrial Property Trust Inc. ("IPT"), an industrial real estate investment trust that owns and operates distribution warehouses throughout the United States, announced today that ...

Bionic Creepy Crawlies in the Factory of the Future?

Bionic ants and robot butterflies may sound surreal, but they are part of the vision one German firm has for the factories of the future.