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Washington state town wary of slow-moving landslide

Washington state town wary of slow-moving landslide UNION GAP, Wash. (AP) — A slow-moving landslide in a fertile farming region in Washington state has forced evacuations as officials prepare for what they say is inevitable — the collapse of a ridge that sits above a few dozen homes and a key highway.


Donald Trump Is in Good Physical and Mental Health, White House Doctor Says

Donald Trump Is in Good Physical and Mental Health, White House Doctor Says President Donald Trump's doctor has recommend that he lose some weight, but said the president is in excellent physical and mental health.


Dinosaur tail to be auctioned for Mexico quake reconstruction

Dinosaur tail to be auctioned for Mexico quake reconstruction By Diego Oré MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A fossilized dinosaur tail discovered in Morocco will be auctioned on Tuesday night in Mexico to raise funds for the reconstruction of thousands of schools damaged by two earthquakes that struck the Latin American nation in September. The 4-metre-(13-foot)-long, 180-kg (396-pound) tail will be offered at a reserve price of 1.8 million Mexican pesos ($95,805), according to organizer Morton's Auction House. Anything raised above the reserve price will be donated to the BBVA Bancomer Foundation to help finance the reconstruction of some 5,000 damaged schools.


Suffering from writer's block? A simple cup of tea gets the creative juices going, scientists say

Suffering from writer's block? A simple cup of tea gets the creative juices going, scientists say A simple cup of tea sparks an instant burst of brainpower and creativity, according to a new study - within minutes of drinking a brew. Volunteers in the study almost immediately scored better results in creative and cognition tests than those who had drunk a glass of water, researchers found. The findings suggest it could be the antidote to everything, from writer's block to artists looking for inspiration during brainstorming sessions. Although tea contains caffeine and theanine, both associated with increased attentiveness and alertness, these do not usually take effect instantly. Instead, researchers believe tea works to enhance and create a 'positive' mood which in turn sparks the brain's cognitive regions into life. In tests for the specialist journal Food Quality and Preference, Yan Huang of Peking University's School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences conducted two tests on up to 50 students, with an average age of 23. Perfect cup of tea As the students gave their name, age and other details to researchers, half were given a cup of black tea to drink and the other half a glass of water, before immediately going into one of two different tests. The first test saw them asked to make an "attractive and creative" design out of building blocks and in the second they were asked to come up with a "cool" name for a new noodle restaurant. Their results were judged by other, non-participating, students for creativity and design and marked on a scale by the researchers. In the block building test, the tea drinkers scored 6.54 points against 6.03 points for the water drinkers. In the name test, the tea drinkers scored 4.11 against 3.78. The results show that tea helped both divergent thinking - the process of coming up with a number of new ideas around a central theme and what most people would consider to define creativity. The report said: "This work contributes to understanding the function of tea on creativity and offers a new way to investigate the relationship between food and beverage consumption and the improvement of human cognition." They added: "Two biological ingredients, caffeine and theanine, have beneficial effects on attention, which is an indispensable part of cognitive function. "But the amount of tea ingredients our participants absorbed was relatively small. Also, theanine facilitates long-term sustained attentional processing rather than short-term moment-to-moment attentional processing." Instead, tea is a 'mood enhancer' and this may have been why it worked so well in the short term, it added.


See How Trump's Approval Rating Stacks Up Against Other Presidents After One Year

See How Trump's Approval Rating Stacks Up Against Other Presidents After One Year Trump has ping-ponged between a low of 35% and a high of 45% during his first year in office


Mormon Church Appoints 93-Year-Old Russell M. Nelson as Its New President

Mormon Church Appoints 93-Year-Old Russell M. Nelson as Its New President He's the second-oldest man to assume leadership of the church


EU parliament calls for ban on electric pulse fishing

EU parliament calls for ban on electric pulse fishing The European Parliament called Tuesday for a ban on electric pulse fishing in the European Union, defying Brussels which wants the experimental practice in the North Sea done on a larger scale. The parliament, the EU's only directly elected body, will now try to strike a compromise with the European Commission, the bloc's executive, and the European Council, which groups the 28 member states.


World's largest sea turtle could come off 'endangered' list

World's largest sea turtle could come off 'endangered' list Federal ocean managers say it might be time to move the East Coast population of the world's largest turtle from the United States' list of endangered animals.


Wreck of Dutch Warship Found Buried Beneath Coral

Wreck of Dutch Warship Found Buried Beneath Coral Divers in the blue waters around the Yucatán Peninsula have discovered three historic treasures: a sunken lighthouse and the remains of an 18th-century Dutch warship and a 19th-century British steamer, according to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH). The battered wrecks were found near the coastal town of Sisal, Mexico, a modern beach destination that was once a bustling port in the 18th and 19th centuries. The shipwrecks were laden with artifacts, including cannons, cutlery and porcelain, said archaeologist Helena Barba Meinecke, head of the INAH's underwater archaeology of the Yucatán Peninsula.


A Nose for Loot? Dogs Training to Sniff Out Stolen Artifacts

A Nose for Loot? Dogs Training to Sniff Out Stolen Artifacts A team of scientists will train dogs to see if the animals can sniff out looted artifacts from the Middle East that are being smuggled into the United States. Now, scientists are hoping the canines can also be trained to sniff out artifacts from Syria and Iraq, war-torn countries that have experienced widespread looting of archaeological sites. "Terrorists, organized crime and common criminals are destroying archaeological sites on an industrial scale to cash in on illegal profits … that is why we need to find out if we can train dogs to help," said Michael Danti, a consulting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, in a statement announcing the creation of the K-9 Artifact Finders research program.


Burn, Baby, Burn: Australian Birds Steal Fire to Smoke Out Prey

Burn, Baby, Burn: Australian Birds Steal Fire to Smoke Out Prey Grassland fires that are deadly and devastating events for many kinds of wildlife are a boon to certain types of birds known as fire foragers. But in Australia, some fire-foraging birds are also fire starters. Three species of raptors — predatory birds with sharp beaks and talons, and keen eyesight — are widely known not only for lurking on the fringes of fires but also for snatching up smoldering grasses or branches and using them to kindle fresh flames, to smoke out mammal and insect prey.


EMILY'S List President: Trump Has Empowered American Women — By Accident

EMILY'S List President: Trump Has Empowered American Women — By Accident Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY's List, shares how she thinks President Trump has affected women during his first year in office.


Massive oil spill spreads in East China Sea, could be world's largest in decades

Massive oil spill spreads in East China Sea, could be world's largest in decades What could be the largest oil spill since 1989's Exxon Valdez is unfolding in the East China Sea after a deadly and fiery collision between two vessels caused a tanker to sink. All 32 crew members are thought to have died aboard the Iranian vessel "Sanchi," which was carrying about 1 million barrels of condensate.  According to Bloomberg News, the ship was transporting hydrocarbon liquid that's a key ingredient for making petrochemicals, including jet fuel. It was headed to the port of Daesan, South Korea when it struck the transport ship "CF Crystal" off China's eastern coast.  SEE ALSO: This chatbot wants to cut through the noise on climate science The tanker and its associated oil slick had been on fire for days after the collision. While the fire likely killed all aboard the ship, it was seen by environmental experts as a way to minimize the broader impacts of the spill, since the flames burned off the lightweight condensate on the ocean surface.   However, the fire is now out, and the ship has sunk, raising the possibility that the harmful cargo is going directly into the sea.  The cargo is different than the crude oil spilled by the Exxon Valdez in 1989, but if all the condensate were to leak into the ocean, it would rank as the biggest spill in decades.  Much remains unknown about the fate of the cargo, and therefore similar can be said about what the environmental impacts will be. Reports in recent days are not encouraging, since there is word of a rapidly spreading oil slick on the surface of the ocean. Citing Chinese authorities, Bloomberg reported that the spill expanded from 3.9 square miles to 52 square miles between Sunday and Monday local time.   An oil spill in the heavily trafficked East China Sea could have significant environmental repercussions. Humpback whales travel through that area, and heavily fished species such as mackerel and bluefin also spend time in that area.  “It is virtually certain that much of the condensate went into the sea in solution, and that toxic underwater hydrocarbon plume will injure marine life exposed to it,” Richard Steiner, an oil spill specialist based in Alaska, told Bloomberg. “Even the burned fraction will leave a toxic residue on the water.” Ma Jun, a Chinese environmentalist, was quoted by CNN as saying the spill took place in one of the most productive fishing areas in the country, known as the Zhoushan fishing ground.  A handout photo made available by the Transport Ministry of China shows smoke rising from the fire on the Panama-registered tanker 'Sanchi' on Jan. 14, 2018.Image: TRANSPORT MINISTRY OF CHINA HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock"We still need to keep an eye on how these contaminants might be carried by the ocean flow to have the impact on the fishing ground," Jun told CNN.  According to Greenpeace International, it's not clear how large this environmental disaster will be, since the amount of condensate that leaked into the water is unknown.  "A major concern is that, now that the tanker has sunk, any condensate which did not yet burn off could continue to leak underwater, disperse and break down quite quickly, significantly complicating clean up operations," the environmental advocacy organization stated in a Jan. 15 fact sheet.  WATCH: 2017 is about to be one of the hottest years of all time


Accused Killer Claims Missing UPenn Student Was Trying to Hit on Him

Accused Killer Claims Missing UPenn Student Was Trying to Hit on Him Blaze Bernstein was stabbed more than 20 times


Chinese solar boom sparks global renewables boon: study

Chinese solar boom sparks global renewables boon: study A Chinese boom in solar panel installation last year helped drive global investment in renewable clean energy technology to record levels, a new study showed Tuesday. After a dip in 2016, overall global investment in the sector rose 3.0 percent to a total $333.5 billion, offsetting falls in Japan, Germany and Britain, according to the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) study. "The 2017 total is all the more remarkable when you consider that capital costs for the leading technology -– solar -– continue to fall sharply," said BNEF chief executive Jon Moore.


Ancient Egyptian Mummies from 4,000 Years Ago Shared a Mommy, DNA from Teeth Reveals

Ancient Egyptian Mummies from 4,000 Years Ago Shared a Mommy, DNA from Teeth Reveals Two millennia-old Egyptian mummies long believed to be brothers are actually half siblings, according to a new paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. The researchers argue the two men shared a mother but had different fathers, which may in turn suggest that the civilization valued a mother's influence more than scholars had realized.


Video Shows Firefighter Catching Child Tossed From Burning Building

Video Shows Firefighter Catching Child Tossed From Burning Building “We were catching babies like a football"


Philippine volcano 'fireworks' draw tourists as residents flee

Philippine volcano 'fireworks' draw tourists as residents flee Spectacular lava "fireworks" shooting from its crater are drawing tourists to the Philippines' most active volcano, authorities said Tuesday as scientists warned of a potential dangerous eruption within days. Lava spurting from Mayon volcano lit up the sky overnight Monday in what scientists said was a sign of increasing activity that prompted official calls for evacuation of areas under threat from a major eruption.


‘This Is a Highly Respectable Family.’ Grandmother Defends Couple Accused in California 'House of Horrors'

‘This Is a Highly Respectable Family.’ Grandmother Defends Couple Accused in California 'House of Horrors' “They were very protective of the kids,” David Allen Turpin's mother said


Kensho's Space index

Kensho's Space index Here's how Kensho's Space index fared in 2017.


You Lie More When Speaking a Second Language

You Lie More When Speaking a Second Language It’s not a matter of proficiency: Karin is equally fluent in German and English, but her emotional experiences are bound more strongly to her mother tongue, simply because she experienced more fundamental, defining emotions as a child. This article was originally published on The Conversation.


'Hanging On to Life.' 4 Police Officers Shot Responding to Domestic Disturbance Call

'Hanging On to Life.' 4 Police Officers Shot Responding to Domestic Disturbance Call The suspect was also wounded


The Real Meaning of the Separation of Church and State

The Real Meaning of the Separation of Church and State It is too important a concept to be misused


Britannia, Druids and the surprisingly modern origins of myths

Britannia, Druids and the surprisingly modern origins of myths We think of the Druids as being embedded in British culture from the mists of ancient times. But what we think we know about Druids is of surprisingly modern provenance.


Humans frozen by cryogenics ‘could be brought back to life in 10 years’

Humans frozen by cryogenics ‘could be brought back to life in 10 years’ Could this lead to immortality?


Australia offers cash for Great Barrier Reef rescue ideas

Australia offers cash for Great Barrier Reef rescue ideas Australia is calling on the world's top scientific minds to help save the Great Barrier Reef, offering hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund research into protecting the world's largest living structure. The UNESCO World Heritage-listed reef is reeling from significant coral bleaching due to warming sea temperatures linked to climate change.


Steyn: Potentially dangerous 'duopoly' with Google-Facebook

Steyn: Potentially dangerous 'duopoly' with Google-Facebook Two lawsuits against Google and Twitter argue tech companies favor liberal and moderate voices and have a bias against conservatives. #Tucker


Palestinian Leaders are Calling on President Mahmoud Abbas to Withdraw Recognition of Israel

Palestinian Leaders are Calling on President Mahmoud Abbas to Withdraw Recognition of Israel The Palestine Liberation Organization’s Central Council declared it should no longer be bound by the 1993 Oslo peace accords


Biologists sniff out another method that microbes use to make methane

Biologists sniff out another method that microbes use to make methane News brief: Every year, microbes produce hundreds of millions of tons of methane, a greenhouse gas that’s more potent than carbon dioxide. Scientists had thought the job was done exclusively through methanogenesis. But in the journal Nature Microbiology, a research team led by the University of Washington’s Caroline Harwood lays out an alternate method that makes use of a backup enzyme called iron-only nitrogenase. “Our findings are significant because they give scientists a second target to chase in understanding biological methane formation and rising methane emissions,” Utah State University’s Lee Seefeldt said in a news release. “In addition, the discovery could drive… Read More


NASA raises safety concerns over Boeing, SpaceX spacecraft

NASA raises safety concerns over Boeing, SpaceX spacecraft Space.com Managing Editor Tariq Malik on NASA's warning about Boeing and SpaceX spacecraft.


Salt Is Not Just Bad for Your Heart, It is Also Bad for Your Brain

Salt Is Not Just Bad for Your Heart, It is Also Bad for Your Brain Discussions about the effects of salt on our bodies are typically focused on heart health. A new study suggests eating too many salty foods could create an inflammatory response that impacts your brain health. In 2015, researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, found that too much salt appeared to reprogram the brains of lab rats.


Feathered Dinosaur Shimmered Like a Rainbow, Fossil Reveals

Feathered Dinosaur Shimmered Like a Rainbow, Fossil Reveals Three years ago, a farmer in the Hebei province of China uncovered a mysterious fossil and brought it to the the Paleontological Museum of Liaoning. Now, after studying the find, scientists have announced that the fossil is of a new, duck-sized dinosaur—and when it lived it had an incredible feather display that shined like a living rainbow. An international team of scientists studying the dinosaur, called Caihong juji, made the discovery by carefully analyzing tiny melanosomes, the part of the cells that contain pigment, in the fossil, which turned up dramatic evidence of the dinosaur’s flamboyant plumage.


1 Woman Dead After Casino Boat Catches Fire Off Florida

1 Woman Dead After Casino Boat Catches Fire Off Florida Passengers and crew members jumped overboard to escape the burning ship


Woman Charged With Murder in Death of Second Infant in 5 Years

Woman Charged With Murder in Death of Second Infant in 5 Years She was previously convicted of second-degree manslaughter in 2011


Canada Debt Survey: A Third Of Canadians Can't Make Their Monthly Payments

Canada Debt Survey: A Third Of Canadians Can't Make Their Monthly Payments As Canadians prepare for a possible interest rate hike from the Bank of Canada this week, a new study is warning that the country's indebted consumers are increasingly struggling to keep up with their expenses. One-third of Canadians say they are no longer able to cover their monthly bills and debt payments, according to a survey carried out by Ipsos for insolvency consultancy MNP, up from 25 per cent in a survey three months earlier. "With interest rates on the rise, Canadians are more stretched financially than they have ever been before," MNP President Grant Bazian said in a statement.


NASA Has First Close Look at Distant Galaxy From Dawn of the Universe

NASA Has First Close Look at Distant Galaxy From Dawn of the Universe NASA’s Hubble Telescope has captured a picture of the young SPT0615-JD galaxy, which existed more than 13 billion years ago. While astronomers have observed some galaxies at this distance, they have only appeared as tiny red pin pricks. A strange phenomenon called gravitational lensing has allowed astronomers to see this ancient galaxy bigger and brighter than any others from this distance.


Progressive eugenics is hardly history – the science and politics have just evolved

Progressive eugenics is hardly history – the science and politics have just evolved From a certain perspective, we're already on the road to practicing a 'progressive eugenics' not a million miles away from what was imagined historically.


Corning’s glass is half full and rising

Corning’s glass is half full and rising We delve into the history of Corning, size up its modern business, and talk future glass innovations in automotive, computing, and pharmaceuticals with Chief Strategy Officer Jeff Evenson.


A Double Suicide Bombing in Baghdad has Killed at Least 38 People

A Double Suicide Bombing in Baghdad has Killed at Least 38 People The explosions also wounded at least 105 people


Google Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day With a Doodle Inspired By His 'I Have a Dream' Speech

Google Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day With a Doodle Inspired By His 'I Have a Dream' Speech The Doodle is inspired by the regular people who made up the Civil Rights Movement


This chatbot wants to cut through the noise on climate science

This chatbot wants to cut through the noise on climate science Noise and misinformation, especially on climate, has long been a problem on social media. To counter this, Australian not-for-profit the Climate Council has created a Facebook Messenger chatbot to inform people about climate science. SEE ALSO: Facebook announces a big News Feed change — and just wants you to be happy Launched on its Facebook page last week, it's an effort to connect with younger people who are interested in issues like climate change, but aren't the most engaged with the organisation — largely due to broader information overload. "Young people are saturated on social media because they're the most active on it, we know that they care and that they've got the thirst for information," Nelli Huié, digital manager at the Climate Council, explained. "But because they've got the highest use of social media, they've got the most voices clamouring to reach them through the News Feed. It can be a real challenge for us to cut through that noise." The Climate Council's chatbot in action.Image: The climate councilThe Climate Council started working with digital agency AKQA on the chatbot project last year. They aim to distill the organisation's high-level science into the more colloquial way people speak on Messenger. "It's really important to us that information on climate science is available to everyone ... making sure we distill that information in a way that anyone can understand it, and anyone can access it," Huié added. The chatbot's first iteration is simple, featuring a script that encourages users to take action on climate and assist in lowering emissions. It starts by giving an update on how countries like Australia are tracking to meet the Paris Agreement and leads into more personal responsibility. Eventually, the goal is for the chatbot to become like a "choose your own adventure" book. "People can [choose] the subject they want more information on, say if it's coal or Great Barrier Reef bleaching, and they can follow along and get information right down to the nitty gritty," Huié said.  In an age where misinformation can swirl around social media unfettered, even by certain world leaders, the chatbot could be a handy tool to bust myths on say, the recent polar vortex in the U.S. "With this chatbot, once people are engaged with it, we are actually able to send them a message and say, 'Hey here's some facts on the polar vortex, and what's really happening.' I think that's a really cool development," Huié remarked. WATCH: This VR gym makes you work out by playing games


L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation

L.L. Bean rebuffs boycott over granddaughter’s big Trump donation A man wipes off the headlights of the L.L. Bean Bootmobile in the parking lot at the facility where the famous outdoor boot is made. L.L. Bean is pushing back against a boycott led by a group urging consumers not to shop at retailers that support President-elect Donald Trump after it was revealed that Linda Bean, heir of the Maine-based company’s founder, had donated to a political action committee that helped elect Trump. “We are deeply troubled by the portrayal of L.L. Bean as a supporter of any political agenda,” Shawn Gorman, L.L. Bean’s executive chairman, said in a statement posted to Facebook late Sunday.


Union leader who says Trump lied about Carrier deal refuses to back down

Union leader who says Trump lied about Carrier deal refuses to back down Trump tours a Carrier factory in Indianapolis, Dec. 1, 2016. Chuck Jones, the union leader who claims President-elect Donald Trump lied to Carrier employees while touting a deal to keep jobs in the U.S., says he started receiving harassing phone calls a half hour after Trump slammed him on Twitter. “I’ve been doing this job for 30 years,” Jones, president of the United Steelworkers Local 1999, told CNN on Thursday morning.


Working, eating and sleeping at the office

Working, eating and sleeping at the office The sight of workers sleeping on the job is common in China, where a surplus of cheap labor can lead to downtime and employees at startup companies work long hours.


Obama seeks ‘irreversible’ opening to Cuba

Obama seeks ‘irreversible’ opening to Cuba This story is part of a weeklong Yahoo series marking one year since the opening of relations between the United States and Cuba.


The Last Days Of Streit's, New York's Jewish Willy Wonka Factory

Photographer Joseph O. Holmes photographs the last days of the 90-year-old Manhattan matzo factory. Located on Rivington Street on Manhattan's Lower East Side, Streit's Matzo Factory has been pumping out as much as 900 pounds of matzo an hour to feed New York's Jewish community for almost a century. After 90 years, though, Streit's is closing-up shop, shutting down its Manhattan factory and ...

Propeller kills factory worker

A 26-year-old factory worker was killed when he was hit by a propeller when the machine he was cleaning reportedly got switched on unintentionally.

Union might postpone vote seeking to organize Boeing's South Carolina plant

By Alwyn Scott NORTH CHARLESTON, South Carolina (Reuters) - Labor union officials say they could postpone a vote seeking to organize 3,000 workers at Boeing Co's factory here in South Carolina if their campaign fails to gain enough traction against fierce opposition from the company and local politicians. Organizers for the International Association of Machinists (IAM) are going door-to-door ...

Union might postpone vote seeking to organise Boeing's South Carolina plant

Labour union officials say they could postpone a vote seeking to organise 3,000 workers at Boeing Co's factory here in South Carolina if their campaign fails to gain enough traction against fierce opposition from the company and local politicians.     Organizers for the International Association of Machinists (IAM) are going door-to-door this week to gauge backing for the April 22 vote, and to ...

Film industry hopes Wednesday rally makes government ‘rethink’ tax credit cut

A film industry rep is expecting one of the biggest rallies in the province’s history Wednesday as talks between the industry and government on the film tax credit continue. Screen Nova Scotia chair, Marc Almon, and other industry members met … Continue Reading